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If you want to divide your daylilies I’ll show you how easy it is to get 4 or 5 daylily divisions from one plant with only one tool. This amazing tool is the easiest way I’ve found to divide daylilies, hostas and other perennial plants in your garden.

If you want to learn how to turn one plant into 4 or 5 for no cost and using only one tool, then this post is for you– keep reading to learn how!

How to divide Daylilies and other perennials with one tool - step by step

Divide daylilies with only one tool!

The best time to divide daylilies

The best time to divide daylilies is shortly after they have finished flowering in late summer to early fall. Since daylilies are very hardy, you could also divide them in early spring, but if you do, they may not flower as nicely in the summer for you. Dividing the daylilies in the fall ensures they have enough time to grow and establish before their bloom season.

With any perennials that you want to divide, you should always try to do it in their off-season.

  • If the perennial is a spring or early-summer bloomer, divide in the fall.
  • If the perennial blooms in the late summer or fall, divide in the spring.

How to divide daylilies video

Watch this video to learn how to easily divide daylilies. Dividing daylilies every few years, you can get 4 or 5 extra plants from just one!

How to divide Daylilies and other perennials that are overgrown or overcrowded

Are your daylilies ready to be divided?

If you’re wondering when to thin out your daylilies or if your daylilies are ready to be divided into multiple plants, use this simple trick: Check the center of your daylily plant to see if there is any dead growth. If your daylilies are leggy, aren’t blooming as well as they used to, or overgrown or have some dead foliage near the inside of the plant, your daylily is ready to be divided.

You can expect to divide daylilies every 4 or 5 years in order to keep them healthy and blooming strong.

Prune before you divide Daylilies and other perennials that are overgrown or overcrowded

Prepare your daylilies for division

Before you divide your daylilies you’ll have to dig them up out of the ground. I like to remove any of the mulch or dead leaves from around the plant. Then I use a pair of pruning shears to trim the foliage of the plant so it’s easier to see where I need to dig. These Fiskars bypass pruning shears are my favorite…  they are the perfect size for all of your every day pruning– not too big and not too small.

What Blooms with What?

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Never know what to plant together? Find out with this FREE Plant Pairing Guide and become a pro at combining plants for the best garden design possible!

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Dig up your daylilies before dividing

The best tool to dig up your daylilies

I absolutely LOVE, LOVE, LOVE my trenching shovel, also called a drain spade (I got it at Harbor Freight). If you don’t have a HF nearby, a transplanting spade is pretty much the same tool with a fancier name. I use it all the time for digging new holes, transplanting and splitting daylilies and other perennials and so much more. Drain spades are used for digging trenches so they are really narrow. It makes it so much easier to dig around and under plants than using a standard shovel. You can also use what’s called  Drain spades tend to be no frills and a little less expensive.​

Just use your transplanting spade or drain spade to dig a circle about 6-12″  outside of the perimeter of your daylily. Once you have a full circle, start digging inward (at an angle) so that you can get underneath the root of the daylily. You should be able to remove the entire plant from the ground fairly easily. If you’re having trouble, wait until you’ve had some rain and it will be easier to dig up.

Use a drain spade or transplanting spade to split your daylilies

Let’s start dividing the daylilies

I used my drain spade for this step, too! Just insert your shovel right into the center of the plant (with the foliage facing upward). One quick push downward should split the plant for you. Sometimes this a little more difficult (like if the plant is very dry). In times like that, I’ve resorted to a hatchet… haha. Daylilies are super hardy so while you should be careful, you don’t have to worry too much about damaging the plant while dividing it.

Once you divide the daylily in half, you can continue to divide the plant by halving the halfs. I recommend getting clumps with roots that are at least 6″ in diameter. For most of my daylilies I was able to get 4 or 5 divisions from one single plant. Plenty to spread around the yard, bring to your garden shares or surprise your family, friends and neighbors with!

Use a drain spade or transplanting spade to split your daylilies

Replant your daylilies in “drifts”

I usually take one of my divisions and stick it right back into the hole where it came from. The rest, I spread around the yard in different places. When you are replanting your daylilies, consider planting them in drifts. This means, planting 3, 5 or 7 plants in a staggered zig-zag grouping that weaves in and out of your other plants. Daylilies look great when planted in drifts and can really “fill up” those empty areas of your garden.

Once planted, give your daylilies a nice long drink of water. They should come back more beautiful than ever next season!

Dividing my daylilies - without any gloves. Thanks Sally

Wrapping Up

Daylilies are really simple to divide and transplant to get more plants for your garden. They are so hardy that you can actually move them at any time of the year, but I would recommend waiting until the fall after they are done blooming for the season. I split about 3 daylily plants into about 15 divisions, which was a good day in the neighborhood if you ask me. The only drawback was that I lost  a pair of gloves to my sneaky little pup Sally — who I caught on camera taking my gloves while I was filming this video fro you! She then dug her own hole and buried my gloves in the yard… as usual.

Daylilies are just beautiful, blooming for months on end… they are also super hardy and easy to care for. If you have yellow or orange daylilies, I’d recommend adding some lavender near them for a beautiful orange/purple combo. Phlox is also a great option. If you want to learn more about plant pairings, check out my free plant pairing guide for amazing plant combinations for each and every season.

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How to divide Daylilies and other perennials with one tool - step by step

What Blooms with What?

Plantpairingguide teal mockup web (custom)

Never know what to plant together? Find out with this FREE Plant Pairing Guide and become a pro at combining plants for the best garden design possible!

I hate SPAM and would never share your email. Powered by ConvertKit
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